Aboriginal Ancestry Admission Policy

 

Background

Aboriginal people comprise 5.4% of BC’s population overall but are under- represented at post-secondary institutions.[1] In 2012, the Ministry of Advanced Education (AVED) hosted a provincial Aboriginal Post-Secondary Forum. Post-secondary students, Aboriginal organizations and post-secondary institutional representatives, and the general public were invited to provide feedback on the proposed Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework developed for the AVED[2].

From this came the “Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework and Action Plan, 2020 Vision for the Future” which “sets out ways to address systemic barriers and achieve systemic institutional change.” The Vision states that:

Aboriginal learners succeed in an integrated, relevant, and effective British Columbia post-secondary education system that enhances their participation in the social, cultural and economic life of their communities, the province, and global society; and the public post-secondary education system is relevant, responsive, respective and receptive to Aboriginal learners and communities.[3]

The 2020 Vision for the Future lists as its goals:

  • Systemic change means that the public post-secondary education system is relevant, responsive, respectful and receptive to Aboriginal learners and communities;
  • Access to community based delivery of programs, through partnerships with Aboriginal institutes and communities;
  • Reduced financial barriers;
  • Seamless transitions from K–12 to post-secondary education; and,
  • Continuous improvement is based on research, data-tracking.

UBC has a role to play.

 

POLICY

Applicants with Aboriginal Ancestry Policy:

In order to be eligible for one of the four reserved positions, applicants must:

  1. Meet all of the eligibility requirements.
  2. Be a Canadian citizen who declares him or herself to be of Indigenous descent (First Nations, Metis or Inuit). Proof of ancestry is required at the time of application.
  3. Undergo the interview process and meet minimum standards.

Acceptable proofs of ancestry include:  photocopy of a Indian Status Card or Tribal Enrolment Card, Métis Membership/Citizenship Card, Inuit or Inuvialuit Tribal Corporation Number or Inuit Registry; or a letter from an official representative of the applicant’s First Nations band, treaty, tribal or traditional council; Inuit land/territory organization; Métis settlement or community organization; or a recognized Aboriginal organization, or another form of identification that is deemed acceptable with consultation from the Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health.

Selection Policy:

The selection of Aboriginal applicants for the Department of Physical Therapy will be made by the Aboriginal Admissions Subcommittee of the MPT Admissions Committee. This subcommittee will be comprised (wherever  possible) of an Aboriginal member of the Faculty of Medicine and ideally The Department of Physical Therapy; the Coordinator of the Division of First Nations Heath Careers; a representative from the Council for the Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health; and members of the MPT Admission Selection Committee.

The Aboriginal Admissions subcommittee will consider all Aboriginal applicant files in order to determine applicants to be brought forward for an interview. Applicants will go through the normal interview process but will be interviewed by a member of the Aboriginal Admissions subcommittee on at least one of the MMI stations stations.

Prior to the final MPT Admissions Committee Cohort Selection Meeting, the Aboriginal Admissions Subcommittee will meet and rank successful candidates, making recommendations for candidates for the maximum number of spaces allotted (4). At the final MPT Admissions Committee Cohort Selection Meeting, all candidates, including Aboriginal candidates, will be reviewed for admission. Aboriginal candidates may be admitted through the general selection process or through recommendation by the Aboriginal Admissions Subcommittee. Unused reserved aboriginal seats will be released for admission of non-aboriginal applicants in the current year. The MPT Admissions Committee has the ultimate responsibility to accept or reject any candidate.

Students must meet all evaluation requirements in order to obtain the Physical Therapy degree.

 

Support:

The Department of Physical Therapy will collaborate with the Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health throughout the recruitment, and admissions process.

The Department of Physical Therapy will liaise with the Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health and the First Nations House of Learning to provide personal support and mentoring of students

[1] 2012. Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework and Action Plan. 2020 – Vision for the Future. Ministry of Advanced Education. Province of British Columbia.

[2] To read more about this event, please refer to the Report located on the Ministry’s website: http://www.aved.gov.bc.ca/aboriginal/docs/2012_Aboriginal_Forum_Report.pdf

[3] Ministry of Advanced Education website: http://www.aved.gov.bc.ca/aboriginal/policy-framework.htm